Can you Imagine having an Imagination?
Written by Jill Ledden   
Friday, 27 June 2008

 Tone Magazine

(Ottawa, Ontario   Canada), March 2007

Can you Imagine having an Imagination? 

Imagination is one of the tools we use to help connect with our world. How connected we are with our inner selves can effect how well we use our imagination.

Do we use it for creating fears? Imagining an undesirable outcome on a situation yet to come?

Or do we use it for creating a life we believe is in alignment with our true selves?

March, 2007tone_magazine_ottawa_ont._canada.gif

 

 

 

 

Can you Imagine having an Imagination?

In last month's Tone magazine, I tapped into the importance of using and developing our imagination.

Imagination is one of the tools we use to help connect with our world. How connected we are with our inner selves can effect how well we use our imagination.

Do we use it for creating fears? Imagining an undesirable outcome on a situation yet to come?

Or do we use it for creating a life we believe is in alignment with our true selves?

Without realizing it, we use our imagination frequently. Without imagination, how can we "see" and appreciate what another is going through? Without imagination, how can we extend ourselves to know what we can do to help another? Without imagination, how can we understand what we want to do in our lives?

Imagination is a great gift given to us.

Not using our imagination is like walking with our eyes closed. Literally! Sure, we will get somewhere, but is it where we want to go. If we can not imagine what we aim to create, how can we effectively create? Without actively using our imagination, we will still create, but will it be what we really want to create?

Opening our imagination is like opening our spiritual vision. With our eyes open, we can see to avoid disasters and head to where we want to go.

Therefore, our ability to imagine, influences our ability to manifest.

Consider this question "How well do you imagine?"

Or consider some easier questions:

Where do you get your ideas?

Do you originate your own ideas? When faced with an obstacle or business problem, do you create your own solution? Can you address the obstacle or problem by thinking of something you have never seen or heard before?

Or do you get your ideas from television, the internet or other outside sources? When you see someone do or create something, does it inspire you to do the same?

If you still have difficulty answering those questions, consider looking at your handwriting. Although handwriting analysis should not be performed by evaluating only a few letters, I am sharing some information in hope that it will help you reflect.

Before continue reading, consider writing this statement on a blank piece of unlined paper, then observe your handwriting after reading the rest of the article: "Will you crack a quacky big jolly smile when seeing the fly landing quickly on the bowl of jelly?"

 

 

Lower case "B", "H", "K", "L"

Writers who handwrite those letters with a full loop may be people who typically can come up with their own ideas of an abstract nature, such as in the areas of philosophy, religion, metaphysics, geometry, mathematics..

Writers who always handwrite the letters with the vertical portion looking like a single line may be people who recognize a suitable idea when presented to them, but may not necessarily originate the idea themselves.

With or without a loop, the height of those letters in comparison to the rest of the writing, indicates the level of complexity of the abstract information the writer appreciates understanding. To put it simpler, writers who write those letters tall appreciate learning complex abstract knowledge.

 

 

Lower case "G", "J", "Q", "Y"

Writers who handwrite those letters with a full lower loop may be people who typically can come up with their own ideas of a materialistic nature and follow through to fruition and create tangible outcomes; such as business plans, projects, decorating, furniture, art pieces.

Writers who always handwrite the letters with the vertical portion looking like the bottom of an umbrella may be people who come up with their own ideas of a materialistic nature and do not want to invest in the energy to pursue their ideas. Instead, they may start then quit, or delegate their ideas to others.

 

How to improve imagination through Handwriting

If you would like to improve your imagination, consider having fun with these exercises once a day for a month each. Using non-lined letter size paper ...

1. Write a page of full looped "L's"

2. When, and if, you feel comfortable, consider incorporating full looped "L's" into your regular handwriting if that is not the usual way you write the letter.

3. Write a page of full looped "G's"

4. When, and if, you feel comfortable, consider incorporating full looped "G's" into your regular handwriting if that is not the usual way you write the letter.

5. If desired, gradually repeat with the other letters: "B", "H", "K"

6. If desired, gradually repeat with the other letters: "J", "Q", "Y"

 

One last question ... How's your children's imagination?

Important: I believe incorporating changes into your handwriting is best done gradually, one change at a time. Only proceed when you feel comfortable to do so. To use dancing as an analogy for our psychological makeup, we are accustomed to dancing the same dance. Changing one step at a time is easier to learn and adapt, than if we were to try to learn many dance steps at once.

And like dancing, have fun with life.


Jill Ledden is a certified Silva UltraMind ESP System instructor, Samadhi meditation instructor, certified Graphanalyst (handwriting analyst). Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

 
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